I’m Back!

That title could be taken as either creepy or awesome, and I choose to believe it’s awesome!

After a super long hiatus (guys, so much stuff can happen in six months! Or so…) I am back to blogging on here with a slight twist. Yes, I’ll still be sharing writing tips and asking for advice (I have a captive audience, who wouldn’t ask for advice?), but I’ll also be discussing my writing journey. I hope it will be inspirational for aspiring writers and lend a sense of hope. It’s hard for everyone, and I hope to show you guys that you’re not alone.

I stopped writing on this blog a while back because I felt like I didn’t have anything more to say. I thought I was getting repetitive and everything that I could say had been said. And then I realized I haven’t been sharing my journey. I haven’t been writing down the nitty-gritty, day-to-day junk that happens.

So, from here on out, you guys are my accountability partners. I’m going to be brutally honest about my week in writing, and you’re going to either be supportive or tell me to suck it up. There really is no third option.

Some days, we might all sit down together to have a good cry and eat an entire cake. Other days we may celebrate and throw confetti. Such is the life of an aspiring author. Sometimes it’s painful, and sometimes it’s downright FUN!

To start off, let me be honest about why I stopped writing to you guys. I was discouraged. It took me a long time to get over this discouragement. Thing is, I almost had a literary agent on the hook, and then I got a rejection letter. Again. Those things will throw you for a loop. Lesson learned: my worth is not found in how many rejection letters I get. I know I’m going to make it one day. Will you be here with me when I do?

Thank you so much for being supportive, and thank you for reading this. I hope to make this blog enjoyable, but also educational. I hope to be personable and open. We’ll see how it goes, but I’m ready to share my COMPLETE journey with you. I hope you stick with me.

Fun with Quotes!

I have a quote hoarding problem. I love them. They’re inspirational, funny, and often cheer me up when I’m down. (I also apologize for so many about writing, but it’s what I do and who I am.) So, in the spirit of writerly fun today, I’m going to share some of my favorites. (Maybe even why they’re my favorites!)

“Do not worry about anything. Instead, pray about everything. Tell God your needs and don’t forget to thank him for the answers. Then the peace of God that passes all understanding will guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.”

Philippians 4:6-8

I tend to worry overmuch. This scripture has gotten me through some really rough patches, and continues to be one of my absolute all-time favorites.

“If you ever find yourself in the wrong story, leave.”

– Mo Willems

First of all, Mo Willems. ‘Nough said. He’s amazing. Secondly, this advice is more helpful in everyday life than you would think it is. Seriously, try giving it to yourself every once in a while.

“The things you are passionate about are not random, they are your calling.”

– Unknown

This quote helped me a lot when I was trying to figure out what to do with the rest of my life. Finding one’s calling is a lot like finding paradise on Earth. You may go through hard times to get there, but you’re gonna love it once you’re living in it.

“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.”

– Thomas Jefferson

The man had loads of wisdom. This quote is so encouraging. I say it as a mantra every time I feel disappointed and just want to give up and give in.

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”

– Eleanor Roosevelt

This first lady has a lot of good quotes, but this is one of my favorites. Dreams are beautiful.

“If you find yourself asking yourself (and your friends) ‘Am I really a writer? Am I really an artist?’ Chances are, you are. The counterfeit innovator is wildly self-confident. The real one is scared to death.”

– Steven Pressfield

Ironically, this helps when I’m asking myself if I’m really a writer. Or having any self-doubt.

“Worship is simply giving God his breath back.”

– Lou Giglio

Without worship I’d stop breathing.

“A well-read woman is a dangerous creature.”

– Lisa Kleypas

My excuse for being a voracious reader. AKA bookaholic. I don’t have a problem, I’m arming myself.

“Look, father, here comes a lion. Yes. It is a lion.”

– Unknown

Confession: only unknown quoter because I don’t know who wrote the song. This super inspirational quote (really, it can be used in any situation) is actually the opening line to The Lion King.

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What quotes make your day better?

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Did you like what you read today? Do you have questions, comments, or cat-killing curiosity about something? If so, please either comment on this post or visit the Contact page and drop me a note!

It was good to have you as a visitor today! Please drop by again, or become family by following the Write Knowledge. Thank You.

Keep Your Eyes Open

Okay, guys, I’m soundtracking this one. In 3… 2… 1…

Why this theme? For one simple, very good reason.

The best piece of writing advice I have ever gotten came from a book I read recently. What was this sage piece of wisdom? Let me share it with you: “Don’t look away.”

Three simple words that changed my story method forever.

Why, you ask? Because until that point, I had been looking away. Away from embarrassing moments. Away from painful moments. Away from moments that could make you cry they’re so wonderful or could make you cry for other reasons. I had been stopping before I hit reality. And what’s the one thing every writer must bring a touch of to their story? That’s right. Reality.

As writers, our first and most important job is to tell a story. But our second most important job is to not look away from those everyday moments that make life… well… life. How are we supposed to bring readers to their knees or make them swoon or laugh or cry if we look away before the full effect takes place?

I’m not just talking about when we’re researching, either. Yes, it’s good to watch an entire moment play out before you, but the whole point of keeping your eyes open is so you can write it accurately. What does the audience gain if you end a touching (thrilling, tear-jerking) scene before its full conclusion, or if you skip the parts you think are “too emotional”.

Answer: nothing.

I know it’s difficult to write and it drains you emotionally, but I beg of you to put in those raw emotions. That’s what makes your characters real.

Is she heartbroken? Show her sobs.

Is he angry? Show his rage. ALL of it.

Study body language and psychology. See what makes your characters tick and how they react to a situation that throws them out of their comfort zone. It’s okay to do this! You know why? Because the second best piece of advice I’ve gotten is: “Kill your darlings.”

Don’t be so attached or so fearful for a character that you just can’t hurt them. Reality, remember? Everyone gets hurt, that’s the horrible truth. Hearts break, people lie or miscommunicate, and everyone has bad days. Just look around you. That girl sitting in the corner Starbucks booth all alone? What’s her story? That busboy in the restaurant that you pay absolutely no attention to – Why does he work there? The mom with three little kids in the grocery store – Is she alone or did she choose to be by herself?

Why?

That is the biggest question you should ever ask yourself. Why do things happen around you? Why are people where they are at this moment. Listen for the stories and when you find them: Don’t. Look. Away.

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What’s the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever gotten?

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Did you like what you read today? Do you have questions, comments, or cat-killing curiosity about something? If so, please either comment on this post or visit the Contact page and drop me a note!

It was good to have you as a visitor today! Please drop by again, or become family by following the Write Knowledge. Thank You

Meet the Muse

Have people ever asked you how (or where) you got the idea for your story, and all you could say was “I honestly do not know”? Perhaps this is because you were visited by what we writers affectionately dub “The Muse”. “The Muse” is a helpful, often unexpected guide that shows us exactly the direction our story should go. Like a guiding angel for us writing-obsessed mortals known as “authors”.

As I’ve written and written and written and then talked to others about writing… and written some more, I have noticed some interesting things about “The Muse”. First of all, “The Muse” is almost always unexpected, as though we don’t think it can happen twice. Secondly, it usually comes in a “lightbulb!” moment where you suddenly know exactly what to write and how to do so. But the most interesting thing I’ve learned about “The Muse” is that it often comes in the form of each individual writer’s learning style.

For those of you who don’t know about learning styles, I’ll explain as I go along.

There are 3 major learning styles, and then variations that mix those three. “The Muse” can show up in any of them. I will use digital props to illustrate my point. (You’re welcome.)

“The Muse” #1 – Visual

Prop1 Prop2

(photos courtesy of my Pinterest account, the original owners are specified in the links there)

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If you are a visual learner, more than likely “The Muse” just visited you. A visually inspired person will see pictures, such as these, and immediately their brain will fly into action. “That’s my character!” “What if _______ did _______ there?” “I bet she’s looking at/for/toward ________.”

Congrats! I am proud to say I am one of these wacky people known as visual learners. I see pictures of film and think “What if?” Which generally leads to a fantastic new story idea that I can’t get down on paper fast enough.

If pictures are your muse, don’t fight it. Storyboard EVERYTHING! Trust me, it helps.

“The Muse” #2 – Audio

If you listened to this and immediately got a ton of story ideas for something really epic, “The Muse” visits you via what you hear! Be it a conversation overheard in a restaurant or a song that sparks a novel, you’re an audio learner!

Congrats again! I also belong to audio learners. (I am almost exactly 50/50 audio and visual.) When you hear a song and want to write a story based on it, don’t be shy! You won’t get sued. It’s “based on” not word-for-word.

My advice to you: soundtrack everything. Every time you’re writing have a playlist with music that fits the tone and message of your book and have it on shuffle and repeat. You won’t regret it, and it will actually make your writing better in the long run.

“The Muse” #3 – Kinesthetic

I will admit, I do not belong to this camp so it is hard for me to pin down what inspires you. I can hazard a few guesses though.

Since Kinesthetic learners need to be DOING something in order to learn (walking, dancing, tapping thier toe, rubbing their earlobe) chances are you’re inspired by actions in other people, or something you do yourself.

Exemplar gratis: Someone does an awesome parquour move and you think “what if my character did that in order to _________?” You’re probably Kinesthetic. You overlap into audio and visual depending on what you’re doing at the time, but you’re always cool and have a unique sense of how you see the world.

In conclusion, embrace “The Muse” and let it guide you. Don’t shy from doing things that help inspire the story within you. And always, ALWAYS, be yourself.

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So, which one are you? Or are you an example of a crossover? I’d love to hear your “Muse” experiences.

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Did you like what you read today? Do you have questions, comments, or cat-killing curiosity about something? If so, please either comment on this post or visit the Contact page and drop me a note!

It was good to have you as a visitor today! Please drop by again, or become family by following the Write Knowledge. Thank You.

From Your Mind to the Page

You see a writing prompt (or, for those with a SERIOUS writer’s mind, any given picture) and a scene instantly plays out in your head. Characters leap into action, and suddenly you have an idea for your next book.

But, how do you get that idea from your head onto a piece of paper without totally mutilating it?

And what if you don’t have anything nearby to write on?

1 – Write it down AS SOON AS YOU THINK IT

These days, even if you don’t have paper nearby, chances are there’s a phone or computer. Phones have these lovely things called “notes” that are basically an electronic notebook. Use them. I do. In fact, I had to clean out my notes the other day because my phone told me there was no room for more. Point being: remember to write them on something solid that ISN’T electronic at a future date.

If you write things down as soon as you think them, you’re more likely to get it down on paper without destroying how you see it in your head. It still may not be pretty, but at least you’ll have the idea on something where you won’t forget it.

2 – Write it down EXACTLY HOW YOU THINK IT

Be literal. If you see something, write it down, no matter how small the detail. Don’t tell yourself that you’ll “remember it”, because chances are you won’t. I’ve done that. “And then, I know that she gets kidnapped by (insert character name here) and he says ‘_____’, but I’ll definitely remember that.”

Spoilers: I didn’t.

So, take a long look at the scene in your head. Study the characters. See their quirks. Study the setting, notice the details. Find noises and smells and tastes.

Example: Stale air. You can both taste and smell that.

Be sure you get down EVERYTHING you see in your head. Everything.

3 – Keep a Writing Journal

I call mine my “Inspiration Notebook”. It’s a simple composition notebook that my sister decoupaged for my birthday, and it goes everywhere with me. If I’m on the move (even from upstairs to downstairs) that book is in my hand. Why? Because then I can write down every single little idea that comes to me. I’m talking everything from “Something about a girl/guy that does _____” to a very intricate detailed scene from my latest endeavor.

I found this tip in a writing article a few years back, and let me tell you this has been one of the most helpful things I have ever done. I find myself thinking farther into a story before sitting down to write it. I write down one idea, and others present themselves. It has increased my efficiency 100 fold. You should really try it.

4 – Don’t delete anything

I know people say this a lot, but it’s true. If a scene (or name or action or settings) doesn’t work for your immediate story/script just set it aside. Don’t discount it as unusable. Maybe it doesn’t fit now, but maybe it will fit in your next work of art.

I know, personally, I have a list of names I want to use, and some of them I haven’t had the gut feeling that they FIT yet. But they will. One day. Same with settings and scenes. I have some things I want to do that sound really cool, but the scene doesn’t fit the story yet.

Don’t give up. You can write better than you believe you can. Get those ideas from the movie screen in your head onto a blank piece of paper. Say it after me: “Blank page, I thwart thee!”

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Did you like what you read today? Do you have questions, comments, or cat-killing curiosity about something? If so, please either comment on this post or visit the Contact page and drop me a note!

It was good to have you as a visitor today! Please drop by again, or become family by following the Write Knowledge. Thank You.