Journey On

Y’all.

The writing journey is a long, arduous process fraught with snares and many, many hours of tears. Blood, sweat, and tears. The writer sits at a keyboard for hours and pours out her heart and soul into a series of stories. She gives her everything to make them come alive.

And she doesn’t even know if anyone will want to read them.

Some days it can seem like no one out there cares at all. Like no one will ever like your writing. Or read one of your books and say “I want to write like that one day.” Or internet stalk every blog post or interview you’ve ever done. It can be hard to believe that’s even a possibility.

Some days you write until your fingers hurt and that troublesome bug bite on your wrist itches like crazy, just so you can look over what you put down on paper and know that those two characters may be fighting now, but they’re going to be crazy happy together later.

Some days it’s drudgery to type each letter, to put them in a line and form a word, and to put words in a line to form sentences, and to put sentences in a line to form paragraphs. You don’t feel it, but you know you have to keep pressing on.

All for the sake of a story.

You see, writers do one very important thing day in and day out. We write.

Rainer Maria Rilke said it so beautifully in “Letters to a Young Poet”

“If, when you wake up in the morning, you can think of nothing but writing . . . then you are a writer.”

Dreams can become reality, but the journey is a huge part of that. If you don’t press through, how are you going to know just how close to your life goals you were? You don’t know when that wall will give out and someone will show your work to just the right person. You only see a little bit in front of yourself.

Never. Give. Up.

Three words that will always follow me when I sit down to write and when I have to search for paper to write down that stellar new idea. Someone once asked what the most important thing is for a writer, and in one word I decisively answered. Perseverance.

Do you have it?

What Writers Can Learn From Dancers

Yes, I’ll admit it. I’ve been on a research spree. This time, it was on dancers — specifically ballerinas. (Don’t ask, you’ll find out later when I come up with some amazing story idea.)

While on this research spree (Okay, so maybe I’m still researching while I write this…), I found myself staring intently at some similarities between these two creative careers: writing and dancing.

Similariy #1 – Flexibility

You know what I’m talking about. Those leaps where they do the splits in midair. The back-bends. The extensions. Dancers have flexibility that other people just don’t have. But, you know what?

They had to work VERY hard to build that flexibility. It didn’t happen overnight, nor were they born with it. Oh, sure, they may have had a talent for it, but that talent had to be exercised with hours in the studio.

Writing is the same way. You have to be flexible. Your WIP will always throw things at you that you weren’t expecting. You have to learn to roll with the punches. Just like a dancer didn’t develop crazy flexibility overnight, neither will you. You have to keep building your flexibility muscle. Keep stepping out beyond your comfort zone. In time, this will become a strength for you.

Similarity #2 – Passion

Have you ever heard a dancer say “I’m doing this for the money”? How about “It sounded like fun”? NO! Why is that? Because dancing is difficult and sometimes painful. The true dancers, the ones that make it far and dance for large audiences, have passion.

Just like in dance, passion keeps a writer going. A true writer HAS TO WRITE. There is no other option for them. They couldn’t stop if they tried. This is passion. Passion drives you. Passion keeps you going. Passion makes you care about what you’re writing and about what others will think about your writing. Which brings us to number 3…

Similarity #3 – Perseverance (AKA Stick-to-it-iveness. Or Persistence.)

You think a dancer got to their position in a ballet or other production with ease? Think again. They worked hard every day of the week. They perfected every step in their audition. They overcame their fear of rejection and danced in front of judges. And some of them still didn’t make that cut.

Sure, as writers we may not have studios or practices or auditions… Or do we?

A writer’s studio is anywhere there’s a paper, pens, or a computer. Any time we sit down to write.

Our practices are everything they learn and write and do habitually every single day. It’s building those muscles in hopes that one day you’ll get your dream.

Our auditions? Yeah, you guessed it. Those dreaded query letters and proposals you send to every literary agent or publisher who will take them. I would even wager that you got rejected. Multiple times.

Never fear! That just means you haven’t hit your prime yet. Their production didn’t need you this time, but that’s not to say they won’t cast you next time. Keep at it! Keep going! Don’t let discouragement and frustration keep you from another audition.

And another.

And another.

Your passion will push you through all of this. If you’re really a writer — if you REALLY HAVE to write — you’ll keep going despite the pain.

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Any other similarities you see? Let me know in the comments!

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Did you like what you read today? Do you have questions, comments, or cat-killing curiosity about something? If so, please either comment on this post or visit the Contact page and drop me a note!

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When a Project Ambushes You…

Recently, I was quite thoroughly and inexplicably ambushed by a project of epic proportions.

What is this project, you ask?

Well, apparently, I’m now writing a musical.  I can’t give you all the details, because it’s still a very early work in progress, but I can say that I never expected myself to write a musical. Even less so did I expect to be ambushed by a project I wasn’t even sure I wanted.

That brings me to the theme of today’s blog post.

What I like to call an “ambush” project is any project that springs to life seemingly on its own. You wake up, and WHAM! it hits you like an anvil over the head. (That just hurts like the dickens!)

These can, and most of the time (with me anyway) do turn out to be some of the greatest things you’ll ever write. Why is that?

Because it already has a life of its own.

The one thing we strive to do as writers is to bring a story to life so vividly that people never question whether the characters are real or not. They are.

If something abushes you, with dialogue and actions just spilling onto the page, you should embrace it! It has taken on a life of its own and flown off on its own. All you have to do is watch and record.

Honestly, sometimes it’s easier if a project ambushes you, because that’s less work to do for the first draft, but don’t get me wrong! Just because the first draft ambushes you and flops itself onto the page, don’t think you won’t have to edit.

If anything, you’ll end up editing more and being even more cautious, because you care about it more. Because it’s GOOD. There’s no shame in letting a project jump onto a page in a matter of 30 to 60 days. Heaven knows I’ve done it a number of times! Just make sure, in the end, you give it the attention and loving correction it needs to turn it into a masterpiece. A true bestseller.

Because being ambushed isn’t bad when you’re a writer.

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When was the last time an entire storyline or dialogue or book just came to you? Has that ever happened?

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Did you like what you read today? Do you have questions, comments, or cat-killing curiosity about something? If so, please either comment on this post or visit the Contact page and drop me a note!

It was good to have you as a visitor today! Please drop by again, or become family by following the Write Knowledge. Thank You.

What I’ve Learned from NaNoWriMo (Weeks 1 & 2)

Fourteen days in. Fourteen. Whole. Days.

Amazingly, I’ve only missed writing on ONE day so far. Usually I’m doing pretty horribly by now. That still leaves me with almost 2,000 words to make up. Joy.

Anyway, on to what I’ve learned from NaNoWriMo this year. Going on the last two weeks alone, I have learned one very important thing as I’ve worked my way from 0 words to almost 23,000. And that one thing is this:

Push through the pain!

I say this because, even though 1,667 words a day doesn’t sound like TOOOOO many, I’ve been having a really hard time getting that many out. Usually, I hit around 1,100 and the words dry up. My mind goes blank. I have no idea where the story is going next.

And that, my creatives, is where I have had to learn to push through the pain.

Those last 600 words can be terrifying and excruciating, but it hasn’t failed yet to be the best part of everything I’ve written. When you finally push through that wall that stands before you, you find jewels on the other side. A secret letter, an unexpected in jury. A love you didn’t know existed for your character. An amazing best friend.

Though it is so difficult to think past writer’s block, I’m learning!

Sometimes it’s easier than other. Sometimes I have to use a writing prompt (and, yes, that’s okay!) Sometimes I have to sit and ask myself “what could go wrong here?” and then write it down. (This is how I end up with things like helicopter chases. Who knew?!)

So, even if you’ve hit that wall. That writer’s block craziness! Just push through the pain and find the treasure on the other side. It will be worth it in the end.

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Do you love your stories? I’m sure I would too! This week, I’d love to hear either A) your summary, or B) Your first page of a recent story. I can’t wait!

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Did you like what you read today? Do you have questions, comments, or cat-killing curiosity about something? If so, please either comment on this post or visit the Contact page and drop me a note!

It was good to have you as a visitor today! Please drop by again, or become family by following the Write Knowledge. Thank You.

“Return to Go”

The all-mighty rejection letter.

You know the one. The one that starts “We regret to inform you” and goes downhill from there. The one that crushes your soul (like a grape) every time you get a new one. And it seems they’re all the same, right? All telling you that you haven’t made it.

Do not pass “Go”.

Do not collect 200 dollars.

I know the feeling, because I’ve been there. Every writer has. Some are lucky enough to get someone who will walk them through the process of rejection until they’re finally accepted. Others, notsomuch.

What does one do with a crushed-grape soul?

First, I fully believe in going to the kitchen, finding a pan of brownies or an entire cake, and eating them. Something about it gives just the right amount of comfort for a grieving writer. It soothes the nerves and definitely boosts your endorphin level… Not really, but I’m trying to give you some hope here.

After you’ve gorged yourself on Marie Antoinette’s final piece of advice (“Let them eat cake”), It gets a little tougher to deal with. Because the next thing you have to do is return to go. Sweep aside your shattered plans, pick up the intact pieces of your dreams, and begin again. Grab that notebook. Turn on your computer. Put your fingers to the keyboard. And let it all flow out onto the page.

Writers work magic with words and emotion. No better time to write emotion than when you’re swimming in a sea of it.

Thirdly, stop thinking of them as “rejection” letters. Sure, the editor/agent/friend/magazine didn’t like that particular piece of work, but they’re not rejecting you as a person. Choose to turn that lie on its head and think of them as “not yet” letters. Most famous writers got hundreds — some thousands — of those letters before they hit their big break. All it takes is one person who believes in you enough to give you a shot.

The name of the writer game is Perseverance! (and a lot of determination) Don’t spend valuable writing time moping about the contract you didn’t get. Return to go and start the race toward the best finish line ever. The contract you have YET to get.

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I’m interested. Worst rejection letter you’ve ever gotten and best rejection letter you’ve ever gotten. What are they?

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Did you like what you read today? Do you have questions, comments, or cat-killing curiosity about something? If so, please either comment on this post or visit the Contact page and drop me a note!

It was good to have you as a visitor today! Please drop by again, or become family by following the Write Knowledge. Thank You

The Power of Daydreams

Tomorrow I will be attending an Olde English Faire. YAY! Why am I so happy? Because it’s a place where you can daydream all you want and no one second guesses you. You know what another place is where you can totally daydream all you want? Your story.

“But, Megan, I thought the purpose of writing fiction is to tell the truth in a new way?!”

It is, but that doesn’t mean you can’t daydream. People read books to escape, so escape with them. I’m pretty sure it’s a rule that if you’re a creative type, you have to daydream. So make the most of it!

“But, Megan, I don’t know how!!!”

Yes, you do. Don’t give me that excuse!

What do you think about when you’re all alone? Do you romanticize things and think about your first kiss? Do you think back on that movie and wonder how you would have done it differently and why? Do you make up jokes and imagine people laughing hysterically at them?

All of these count as daydreams. And all would make a great book/movie. One of the greatest books/plays of all time is titled “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. Heard of it? Yeah, I thought so. It’s all about a dream. (Just a daydream without the day).

So what’s stopping you from writing your daydreams?

“It’s not realistic enough. People will laugh and stop reading/watching.”

This is called fear, and it’s very easy to overcome. I’ll teach you. Follow me. 1) Take a deep breath. 2) Tell yourself “I can do this!” 3) Put your fingers to the keyboard or pick up that pen. 4) WRITE!

It’s just that easy.

“It’s stupid.”

This is called an excuse, and it’s very easy to overcome. 1) Take a deep breath. 2) Tell yourself “I am a writer!” 3) Pull yourself together and put your fingers on that keyboard. 4) WRITE!!

Seeing a pattern? Good! All obstacles can be overcome by simply DOING. Don’t let anything push you down and don’t let anyone tell you that your daydreams are impossible or dumb. Daydreams often come from your heart or your passion. Don’t let anyone kill that. Embrace the dream. Write the dream. You’ll be a better person for it, trust me!!!

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What’s your favorite daydream? I’d love to know!

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Did you like what you read today? Do you have questions, comments, or cat-killing curiosity about something? If so, please either comment on this post or visit the Contact page and drop me a note!

It was good to have you as a visitor today! Please drop by again, or become family by following the Write Knowledge. Thank You