When Disaster Strikes

We all know the feeling, right? That little moment of panic when something doesn’t work right or… you know… at all.

Guys, I have to tell you because I promised to be open and honest. I totally panicked last night. Why, you ask? Let me tell you a little story.

It was a normal Monday evening. I had prepared myself to head downstairs to fetch dinner, and everything was going swimmingly. I had written 1,500 words (my goal for the day) and clicked save on the 53,000 words (or so) of my current WIP.

Then, it happened. I set the computer down and it slid from the edge of the bed. With a cry of “No!” That would have made Luke Skywalker proud, I snatched for it. But, alas, it was too late.

This would not have distressed me so, except for one little detail. When the computer landed on the floor (mind you, it did not fall more than six inches, the bed is just a mattress on the floor), it landed on the side I keep my flashdrive in. Yes, folks, that’s right. The drive I use to hold ALL MY WORK bent.

It isn’t funny, and it isn’t fixable. When I plugged it back in, it would not pull up. At. All. That’s when I panicked. Years of work, all my finished projects, everything I need for my upcoming Kindle projects (more on that later), all reside on that drive.

There is exactly a 50/50 shot that the computer tech will be able to pull the data off of it.

In normal writerly fashion, after I freaked out for a good hour to two hours, I sat back and thought about how I felt at the moment of panic. “Not good” was the first thought that zipped through my brain, but then I took the time to psychoanalyze myself. (Yeah, I do that. Blame the writer thing.)

I realized that, if I ever get the data back (and I’m praying fervently I will), I will possibly be able to accurately write a moment of disaster even better than my previous attempts.

Why?

I’m so glad you asked.

Writing is all about the emotion, and any writer will tell you that in order to write emotion well, you have to experience it. Loss, panic, fear. Take your minuscule situation and amp it up a hundred-fold.

That, folks, is how you make a reader feel the story. How you make your readers cry. Honestly, who doesn’t dream of writing something that will evoke emotion from their fans? I know I do.

Emotion comes from experience and, sadly, experience happened to me yesterday. I need that data back, guys. When the story is complete and I have my answer, I will be in touch with the (hopefully) good news. Thanks for listening to my rant, all!

.

UPDATE!!! We were able to retrieve the data from my flash drive. WIPs not lost. Praise Jesus!

.

.

Biggest disaster and panic moment you’ve ever had. I want to hear about it!

.

.

.

Did you like what you read today? Do you have questions, comments, or cat-killing curiosity about something? If so, please either comment on this post or visit the Contact page and drop me a note!

It was good to have you as a visitor today! Please drop by again, or become family by following the Write Knowledge. Thank You.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s