Meet the Muse

Have people ever asked you how (or where) you got the idea for your story, and all you could say was “I honestly do not know”? Perhaps this is because you were visited by what we writers affectionately dub “The Muse”. “The Muse” is a helpful, often unexpected guide that shows us exactly the direction our story should go. Like a guiding angel for us writing-obsessed mortals known as “authors”.

As I’ve written and written and written and then talked to others about writing… and written some more, I have noticed some interesting things about “The Muse”. First of all, “The Muse” is almost always unexpected, as though we don’t think it can happen twice. Secondly, it usually comes in a “lightbulb!” moment where you suddenly know exactly what to write and how to do so. But the most interesting thing I’ve learned about “The Muse” is that it often comes in the form of each individual writer’s learning style.

For those of you who don’t know about learning styles, I’ll explain as I go along.

There are 3 major learning styles, and then variations that mix those three. “The Muse” can show up in any of them. I will use digital props to illustrate my point. (You’re welcome.)

“The Muse” #1 – Visual

Prop1 Prop2

(photos courtesy of my Pinterest account, the original owners are specified in the links there)

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If you are a visual learner, more than likely “The Muse” just visited you. A visually inspired person will see pictures, such as these, and immediately their brain will fly into action. “That’s my character!” “What if _______ did _______ there?” “I bet she’s looking at/for/toward ________.”

Congrats! I am proud to say I am one of these wacky people known as visual learners. I see pictures of film and think “What if?” Which generally leads to a fantastic new story idea that I can’t get down on paper fast enough.

If pictures are your muse, don’t fight it. Storyboard EVERYTHING! Trust me, it helps.

“The Muse” #2 – Audio

If you listened to this and immediately got a ton of story ideas for something really epic, “The Muse” visits you via what you hear! Be it a conversation overheard in a restaurant or a song that sparks a novel, you’re an audio learner!

Congrats again! I also belong to audio learners. (I am almost exactly 50/50 audio and visual.) When you hear a song and want to write a story based on it, don’t be shy! You won’t get sued. It’s “based on” not word-for-word.

My advice to you: soundtrack everything. Every time you’re writing have a playlist with music that fits the tone and message of your book and have it on shuffle and repeat. You won’t regret it, and it will actually make your writing better in the long run.

“The Muse” #3 – Kinesthetic

I will admit, I do not belong to this camp so it is hard for me to pin down what inspires you. I can hazard a few guesses though.

Since Kinesthetic learners need to be DOING something in order to learn (walking, dancing, tapping thier toe, rubbing their earlobe) chances are you’re inspired by actions in other people, or something you do yourself.

Exemplar gratis: Someone does an awesome parquour move and you think “what if my character did that in order to _________?” You’re probably Kinesthetic. You overlap into audio and visual depending on what you’re doing at the time, but you’re always cool and have a unique sense of how you see the world.

In conclusion, embrace “The Muse” and let it guide you. Don’t shy from doing things that help inspire the story within you. And always, ALWAYS, be yourself.

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So, which one are you? Or are you an example of a crossover? I’d love to hear your “Muse” experiences.

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Did you like what you read today? Do you have questions, comments, or cat-killing curiosity about something? If so, please either comment on this post or visit the Contact page and drop me a note!

It was good to have you as a visitor today! Please drop by again, or become family by following the Write Knowledge. Thank You.

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